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European Markets Archives | Page 3 of 29 | Elliott Wave Analytics

  • GREXIT!
    By on May 5, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    The way we see it, history is needed to guide us. Greece cannot continue indefinitely in depression, and it cannot pay. There is no good outcome. The people of Greece need a political outcome to give them a victory. We will invoke two historical images, one at the beginning of this commentary and on...
  • World Markets Weekend Update: The Worst Week of 2015
    By on May 3, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    Six of the eight indexes on our world watch list traded lower this week, with China’s Shanghai Composite as the top performer for the third consecutive week, gaining 1.89% in holiday shortened week. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was the other index to post a gain, albeit a modest 0.26%. The S&am...
  • 11 Signs That We Are Entering The Next Phase Of The G...
    By on April 26, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    Well, the Nasdaq finally did it.  It has climbed all the way back to where it was at the peak of the dotcom bubble.  Back in March 2000, the Nasdaq set an all-time record high of 5,048.62.  On Thursday, after all these years, that all-time record was finally eclipsed.  The Nasdaq closed at 5056....
  • 3 Things: Kass, Rosie and Short
    By on April 25, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    “3 Things” is a weekly publication of ideas, usually contrarian, to provoke thoughtful discussions and decision-making processes. As a portfolio strategist, I am sharing things that I am considering with respect to current investment models and portfolio allocations. Please feel free to...
  • Spain: Unemployment Rate 23.7% – 114,300 Jobs V...
    By on April 25, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    The economic recovery in Spain has gone from jobless to jobloss. Spain shed 114,300 jobs in the first quarter of 2015. Via translation from El Pais, Spain’s Unemployment Rate Rose Slightly in the First Quarter. The economic recovery has not been enough to create jobs. In the first three month...
  • Central Banks: Another Stunning Long-Term Chart
    By on April 24, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    From a recent presentation(.pdf) by Agustín Carstens, Bank of Mexico governor and chairman of the IMF’s International Monetary and Financial Committee, via this item at Wolf Street comes the chart below that, once again, reminds us all how far removed the global financial system is from anything...
  • When All News Is Bad News
    By on April 23, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    One of the defining traits of financial bubbles is the willingness of traders and investors to interpret pretty much everything as a buy signal. Rising corporate earnings mean growth, while falling profits mean easier money on the way. War means more revenues for defense contractors and easy money f...
  • IMF and Greece
    By on April 23, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    “Greece could make it a few months delaying payment to the IMF — but it will need to reach an accord with its creditors by late July” writes Bloomberg Economist David Powell in this morning’s Bloomberg Brief. http://briefs.blpprofessional.com/issue?id=N-wZwyI1MP7GwRxM1xpNQA__ At Cumberland,...
  • Grexit: Remaining Eurozone No Longer ‘Base Case’ ...
    By on April 23, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    According to the Wall Street Journal, Greece staying in the eurozone is no longer “the base case” for European officials, and one even told the Journal that “literally nothing has been achieved” in negotiations with the new Greek government since the Greek election almost three months ago. ...
  • Four Totally Bad Bear Recoveries: Where Are We Now?
    By on April 21, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    At the request of The Advisory Group in San Francisco, here’s updated comparison of four major cyclical bear markets. The numbers are through the April 17 close. This chart series features an overlay of the Four Bad Bears in U.S. history since the market peak in 1929. They are: The Crash of ...
  • The Global Liquidity Squeeze Has Begun
    By on April 19, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    Get ready for another major worldwide credit crunch.  Today, the entire global financial system resembles a colossal spiral of debt.  Just about all economic activity involves the flow of credit in some way, and so the only way to have “economic growth” is to introduce even more debt into the ...
  • Greece Contagion Risk
    By on April 19, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    Source: Bloomberg.  Today, April 17, 2015.   Hat tip to Erwan Mahe, my articulate and observant friend in Paris who emailed me a note this morning. “Central banks in southeastern European countries, in cooperation with ECB’s SSM, have told banking subsidiaries of Greek lenders in their countr...
  • Germany’s Trade Surplus Is a Problem
    By on April 10, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    In Code Red I wrote a great deal about trade imbalances among the various European countries, which were at the heart of the European sovereign debt problem. As the peripheral countries have tried to rebalance their trade deficits with Northern Europe and especially with Germany, they have seen thei...
  • Flows Into European Equities Reaches Feverish Pitch, ...
    By on April 3, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    So far the bullish themes for this year are foreign equities and U.S. bonds with the continued surge in the USD. These themes are borne out when looking at flows into exchange traded funds (ETFs) by asset class and geographic region. This can be seen in the table below that looks at ETF flows from t...
  • Aftershocks, Part 1: That Austrian Bank
    By on March 13, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    Sometimes little things are the start of much bigger things. Probably the most famous historical example of this is the June 1914 assassination of an Austrian archduke who, it’s safe to say, 99% of the world had neither heard of nor cared about. But the aftershocks of the deed produced the biggest...
  • Central Banks Want Inflation, But Are Getting Potenti...
    By on February 5, 2015 | No Comments  Comments
    The fears after 2001 were that the Fed’s easy money policies to pull the economy out of the 2001 recession, followed by even more easing, including the near-zero Fed Funds rate instituted after the 2008 financial meltdown, would result in runaway inflation. Spiraling inflation was so sure to show ...

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