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European Markets Archives | Page 28 of 29 | Elliott Wave Analytics

  • David Faber, Chris Whalen and Euro Banks.
    By on August 11, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    I think a lot of Chris Whalen over at Institutional Risk Analytics, so I tuned in CNBC to listen to him this morning. At one point the discussion turned to Europe and Chris made it clear: There are growing funding issues at some European banks David Faber jumped out of his chair and challenged Wha...
  • Real Estate Rolling Over — Everywhere!.
    By on August 8, 2011 | 44 Comments44 Comments  Comments
    The double dip in the US housing market isn’t unique, based on all the similar reports popping up around the world. Here are four from yesterday: Hong Kong Home Sales at Lowest Since Early 2009 on Rates, Curbs The number of housing transactions in Hong Kong plunged to the lowest in 30 months on ri...
  • Game Over For The European Ponzi Scheme?.
    By on August 5, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    The following are illustrative setups based on SPY options with some actual plays based upon my European Bank Run Research (see list at the bottom of this article). This was written yesterday evening, French time, as the S&P was at 124.60, trending downward. (Note: the market has literally colla...
  • On Your Mark, Get Set, (Bank) Run!…
    By on August 2, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    Here are a few updates supporting my thesis of the potential of a serial bank run (another one, that is) in Europe and the Eurozone. As was the case with Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearn (two of the biggest bank collapses that I have called during this “ongoing crisis), counterparties and fundi...
  • An Update On Seasonality.
    By on July 30, 2011 | 40 Comments40 Comments  Comments
    There are a number of seasonal patterns, ranging all the way from the very short-term tendency for a ‘countertrend’ move an hour or so after the market opens each day, to the Four-Year Presidential Cycle, and even to the 17 to 20-year ‘secular bull/secular bear cycle. We’re currently in the...
  • Global Markets Are Still Sliding.
    By on July 22, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    In the U.S., almost 150,000 new jobs must be created each month to handle new young people coming into the labor force. For several months the economic recovery had come along well enough that that was being accomplished. But economists were shocked when only 25,000 jobs were created in May, and eve...
  • European Bank Stress Test: “It’s not that...
    By on July 20, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    The European Banking Authority announced Friday that 8 banks had failed their stress tests and 16 more had narrowly passed. But the results drew much criticism from analysts, who said that the stress test is not strict enough. Indeed, this is something that European Financial Forecast readers have...
  • Is UK PM Set To Resign Or Will UK Default Come First?...
    By on July 19, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    Dramatic developments over recent hours regarding the political and financial stability of the United Kingdom.  According to the intelligence garnered by the folk at Zero Hedge some shocking news is on the way  – the problem is we don’t know which one will come first?. What started off...
  • Contagion To Set Alight United Kingdom?.
    By on July 19, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    According to the folks over at Zero Hedge, who seem to be able to somehow sniff out these imminent disasters sometimes months in advance have just discovered that the European contagion may well be about to set alight in the UK, starting at Loyds PLC.  This of course would be a disaster of markets ...
  • New Crisis: Contagion Spreads To Italy
    By on July 11, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
      As was reported last week, Europe has suddenly found itself shocked, shocked, that the bond vigilantes decided to not pass go and go directly to the purgatory of the European core, in the form of the country that, at €1.5 trillion euros, has more debt than even Germany, but far more impo...
  • Portuguese Bonds In Melt Down.
    By on July 7, 2011 | 287 Comments287 Comments  Comments
      Portuguese Bonds in Melt Down – Euro Gold Rises to €1,056/oz – 3% From Record Nominal High on Contagion Risk Gold is trading at $1,515.06/oz, €1,055.42/oz and £945.73/oz. Gold is marginally higher in most currencies today and has risen a further 0.55% against the euro to EUR1,05...
  • After Greece, Portugal.
    By on July 6, 2011 | 245 Comments245 Comments  Comments
    Now that Greece has been kicked down the road, it’s time for the other PIIGS countries to start lining up for similar deals. Portugal looks to be next, after its most recent deficit report: Portugal’s 1Q Budget Deficit Higher Than Expected LISBON (Dow Jones)–Portugal’s budget deficit for ...
  • S&P Says Greek Rollover Plan Likely Default!
    By on July 5, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    Last Wednesday we cited from a Reuters report, according to which the last ditch Greek MLEC/CDO rescue operation, would be welcome to S&P and Moody’s as “The whole charm of the French model is that it was worked out in a such way that it will be fine with the rating agencies.̶...
  • Default Is Not The End Of The World.
    By on June 20, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    The Only Way Forward Is to Accept Reality: Default Is Not the End of the World The catastrophe isn’t default, it’s “extend and pretend.” Unwelcome crises are part of life. What’s unnatural isn’t crisis, it’s pretending that life should be nothing but a smo...
  • Will Greece Trigger “Lehman-Like” Avalanc...
    By on June 17, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    Keeping a track of all the fluid, hourly changing developments in Greece can be unbearably complex, and as a result one may be left with the impression that things are better than they really are. They aren’t. As the SocGen report below summarizes, Greece may have about 72 hours before it giv...
  • Roubini: Eurozone Headed For Break-Up.
    By on June 15, 2011 | No Comments  Comments
    The muddle-through approach to the eurozone crisis has failed to resolve the fundamental problems of economic and competitiveness divergence within the union. If this continues the euro will move towards disorderly debt workouts, and eventually a break-up of the monetary union itself, as some of t...

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