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The Coming Wealth Transfer

  • Written by Syndicated Publisher No Comments Comments
    December 11, 2014

    History may not repeat but it sure does rhyme. Mike Maloney has studied monetary and financial breakdowns throughout history and concludes that there’s nothing new or different happening this time, except its global and far more massive than any other time in history.

    Worse, there are echoes of 1911 where a series of diplomatic blunders and national pride and intransigence combined to create the still largely inexplicable start to WW I.

    Chris Martenson: Well it’s global this time, right? This is — there’s nowhere to hide. (…)  What has happened when we’ve tried to print our way to prosperity before? What has happen? Why has it happened and what have been the consequences always been?

    Mike Maloney: Whenever you try to print your way to prosperity it transfers well from the masses to the few. The few being the people running the game and then also the hucksters that are very nimble, the con artists and so on. You see these people get rich during the Weimar Hyperinflation. There were quite a few of these fancy salespeople that got rich; they didn’t stay rich once things stabilized again.

    But it creates such a topsy turvy world that the normal person that does not know how to operate under these weird economic conditions cannot possibly keep up with things and wealth is transferred away from those people to the people that are very good at observing what’s going on that second and adjusting to it. But the one thing that I see as a constant throughout history is that gold and silver eventually do an accounting of all this — the financial — you know financial finessing that the governments are doing.

    And when it does that it — there is a transfer of wealth to the people that own gold and silver. And so — it’s very rare moments in history. This does not happen often. But it’s a great opportunity and I’ve just — you know if you look at gold right now the public’s opinion of gold is quite low because it’s been going down for three years.

    But if you look at it in a longer timeframe and I started investing in gold in 2002 and by early 2003 I started investing in silver and if you look at it from the year 2000 it’s still the best performing of the assets. It’s still out performed the Dow and S&P and real estate.

    And I will continue, myself, to accumulate on the way down I see this as an opportunity. And if it goes lower than it is right now, you know nobody has a perfect crystal ball. So it may have already put in its lows. But I just accumulate every single month and I will continue doing that because I see that as the only sure thing in this crazy world of currency creation.

    Click the play button below to listen to Chris’ interview with Mike Maloney (43m:35s)

     Chris Martenson: Hello and welcome to this Peak Prosperity podcast, I am your host Chris Martenson. As we watch the world’s central banks try increasingly risky and bizarre monetary experiments the question always forms, I get asked this a lot, “Is there anything that I can do to protect myself from the potential, if not inevitable consequences of those actions”?

    Now consider Japan’s central bank is now openly printing enough money to buy 100% of all new debt issued by the government and billions of dollars of stocks each month, right? And they will continue these efforts until morale read more

    Images: Flickr (licence attribution)

    About the Author  

    Executive summary: Father of three young children; author; obsessive financial observer; trained as a scientist; experienced in business; has made profound changes in his lifestyle because of what he sees coming.

    First of all, I am not an economist. I am trained as a scientist, having completed both a PhD and a post-doctoral program at Duke University, where I specialized in neurotoxicology. I tell you this because my extensive training as a scientist informs and guides how I think. I gather data, I develop hypotheses, and I continually seek to accept or reject my hypotheses based on the evidence at hand. I let the data tell me the story.

    It is also important for you to know that I entered the profession of science with the intention of teaching at the college level. I love teaching, and I especially enjoy the challenge of explaining difficult or complicated subjects to people with limited or no background in those subjects. Over the years I’ve gotten pretty good at it.

    Once I figured out that most of the (so-called) better colleges place “effective teacher” pretty much near the bottom of their list of characteristics that factor into tenure review, I switched gears, obtained an MBA from Cornell (in Finance), and spent the next ten years working my way through positions in both corporate finance and strategic consulting. From these experiences I gather my comfort with numbers and finance.

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