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Ben Wins. Who Loses?

  • Written by Syndicated Publisher No Comments Comments
    September 16, 2012

    The most significant market adjustment since Bernanke used the ‘unlimited’ word is not in stocks, bonds or PMs. It’s in inflation expectations. Have a look at this chart. Focus on the incredible spike in the past 24-hours.

     

    The sick part of this is that if Bernanke saw this graph, he would cry with tears of happiness. This is exactly what he was praying for. Ben thinks that inflation is a good thing. That it will cause demand to be pulled forward as people realize that things are going to cost more tomorrow than they do today.

    I suspect Ben is right. Higher inflation expectations in the US will filter around the globe. Post the extraordinary steps Ben took yesterday, people will be stocking up on “stuff”. Things like rice, flour, cooking oil, soy, wheat and sugar. If you can eat it, buy it now. It will be more expensive in a month. While your at it, fill up the gas tank, the price is going up next week and every week for the next few months.

    Ben doesn’t care about that stuff. He ignores this altogether. Maybe he’s right, after all, food and energy are really not so important to the 7Bn folks who happen to be passing through this decade, right?

    Some day the history books will study this period of time and ponder how so many people gave up control of key elements in their lives without ever having a say in the outcome. How could one person have gotten so powerful? Somehow we have anointed Ben as the new God. An omnipotent decider that is nether elected or whose power is somehow checked. Don’t think for a minute that he’s one of those benevolent gods, he’s not.

    Images: Flickr (licence attribution)

    About The Author – Bruce Krasting

    I worked on Wall Street for twenty five years. This blog is my take on the financial issues of the day. I was an FX trader during the early days of the ‘snake’ and the EMS. Derivatives on currencies were new then. I was part of that. That was with Citi. Later I worked for Drexel and got to understand a bit about balance sheet structure and corporate bonds from Mike Milken. I was involved with a Macro hedge fund later. That worked out all right, but it is not an easy road. There was one tough week and I thought, “Maybe I should do something else for a year or two.” That was fifteen years ago. I love the markets. How they weave together. For twenty five years I woke up thinking, “What am I going to do today to make some money in the market”. I don’t do that any longer. But I miss it.

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